Heart Mind

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 47--54

Inflammatory and vascular correlates of mood change over 8 weeks


Jonathan W Birdsall1, Samantha L Schmitz2, Oluchi J Abosi3, Lyndsey E DuBose4, Gary L Pierce5, Jess G Fiedorowicz6 
1 Department of Psychiatry; Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
2 Department of Psychiatry, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
3 Department of Psychiatry; Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
4 Department of Health and Human Physiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
5 Department of Health and Human Physiology; François M. Abboud Cardiovascular Research Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
6 Department of Psychiatry; Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine; Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health; Department of Health and Human Physiology; François M. Abboud Cardiovascular Research Center; Department of Internal Medicine; Iowa Neuroscience Institute, Obesity Research and Education Initiative, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Jess G Fiedorowicz
200 Hawkins Drive W278GH, Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1057
USA

Background: Mood disorders have been associated with a variety of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, including inflammation and large arterial stiffness, particularly while depressed, although longitudinal studies have been limited. Materials and Methods: With measurements at baseline and 8 weeks, the researchers prospectively assessed mood, levels of inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-α]), serum lipids, and large arterial stiffness in a cohort of 26 participants with a diagnosis of a mood disorder, enriched for current depression. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Montgomery–Šsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) at baseline and 8 weeks. Associations between depressive symptoms and other measures were assessed using linear mixed models, unadjusted and adjusted for age and body mass index. Results: The mean age of the participants (n = 26) was 41.6 (standard deviation [SD] 12.8) years, and 81% were female. During the study, there was a mean (SD) MADRS score improvement of 9.5 (9.4) from baseline to 8 weeks. Reductions in the primary outcome of tumor necrosis factor-α with improvement in depression fell short of statistical significance (P = 0.076). In secondary analyses, there was a statistically significant association between improved cholesterol ratio (P = 0.038) and triglycerides (P = 0.042) with improvement in depression. There was no statistically significant change in large arterial stiffness during the study. Conclusion: Improved depressive symptoms were associated with improved cholesterol ratios even after adjustment, suggesting a possible mechanism by which acute mood states may influence CVD risk. Future longitudinal studies with extended and intensive follow-up investigating CVD risk related to acute changes and persistence of mood symptoms are warranted.


How to cite this article:
Birdsall JW, Schmitz SL, Abosi OJ, DuBose LE, Pierce GL, Fiedorowicz JG. Inflammatory and vascular correlates of mood change over 8 weeks.Heart Mind 2019;3:47-54


How to cite this URL:
Birdsall JW, Schmitz SL, Abosi OJ, DuBose LE, Pierce GL, Fiedorowicz JG. Inflammatory and vascular correlates of mood change over 8 weeks. Heart Mind [serial online] 2019 [cited 2022 Dec 9 ];3:47-54
Available from: http://www.heartmindjournal.org/article.asp?issn=2468-6476;year=2019;volume=3;issue=2;spage=47;epage=54;aulast=Birdsall;type=0