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Heart and Mind Journal is inviting systematic reviews (meta-analyses) on the theme of psychosomatic diseases.


Systematic reviews (meta-analyses) may offer a more reliable and clear knowledge base about the relations between diverse psychosomatic diseases. However, the increasing popularity of meta-analyses (systematic reviews) haven’t brought more meta-analyses of studies published in psychosomatic medicine.

Given that, we plan to launch a round of calling for papers: systematic reviews (meta-analyses) - psychosomatic diseases

We hope the articles to be published could keep us up to date, offer different perspectives on understanding the same topic, and discover new questions in the field of psychosomatic diseases.

Potential contributions may aim to, but are not limited to:
  • Overview the current state of knowledge
  • Integrate and synthesize extant knowledge
  • Develop conceptual frameworks
  • Identify essential research gaps in the body of extant research
  • Suggest future research directions
Please submit your paper before October 15, 2022, and submit it online: https://www.heartmindjournal.org/submitarticle.asp or send your paper to [email protected] directly.


Special Issue (Ongoing): Heart disease and stroke Edited by Prof. Yuchuan Ding

Leading Guest Editor:

Prof. Yuchuan Ding, M.D., Ph.D., Professor Wayne State University School of Medicine, USA

Prof. Yuchuan Ding is Vice Chair for Research, Director of Cerebrovascular Research, Department of Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine. He is nationally and internationally renowned as an expert in stroke therapy, traumatic brain injury and thermal injury research.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the worldwide leading cause of death in 2019 was ischemic heart disease at 8.9 million and the second leading cause of death was stroke at 6.1 million. The inextricable links between heart disease and stroke are well known, as the incidence of stroke complicated by heart attack is 30% and the mortality rate is as high as 54%. In addition, symptoms of cardiovascular disease, such as atrial fibrillation and heart failure, may intensify the inflammatory response after stroke and worsen functional outcomes.

We aim to ameliorate the worldwide impact of heart disease and stroke through the prevention of common risk factors, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, smoking and secondhand smoke exposure, obesity, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, and mental stress. We hope to reduce health disparities through improvements in health outcomes across geographic, racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups. These efforts will help lower adverse events and death rates from heart disease and stroke. This Special Issue on heart disease and stroke will comprehensively explore the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, outcome, and the interactions of these two diseases. We hope that the publications in this Special Issue will inspire physicians and researchers searching for strategies to better the lives of their patients.

For submission, please go to [email protected] or submit online through the website: https://www.heartmindjournal.org/submitarticle.asp before November 30, 2022. Articles in any formats including original research, editorials, reviews, clinical reports, and commentaries will be considered.

Special Issue (Ongoing): Cognitive impairment and delirium associated with cardiac surgery and anesthesia Edited by Prof. Zhongcong Xie

Cardiac surgery has developed rapidly over the past few decades. Clinically, cognitive impairment and delirium occur in patients after cardiac surgery under anesthesia. However, the investigation of perioperative cognitive impairment and delirium in patients with cardiac surgery remains largely to be performed. We, therefore, call for the submission of the manuscripts in this special issue – “Cognitive impairment and delirium associated with cardiac surgery and anesthesia” in the Journal of Heart and Mind. This issue will include, but is not limited to, risks of perioperative cognitive impairment and delirium in patients with cardiac surgery; application of multidisciplinary collaboration in cardiac surgery under anesthesia; improvements of anesthesia care for patients with cardiac surgery; and mechanisms and interventions of cognitive impairment and delirium after cardiac surgery.

For submission, please go to [email protected] or submit online through the website: https://www.heartmindjournal.org/submitarticle.asp before 30th, October, 2022. Articles in any formats including original research, editorials, reviews, clinical reports, and commentaries will be considered.

Special Issue (Ongoing): Sleep, mental health and cardiovascular diseases Edited by Prof. Lin Lu

Leading Guest Editor:

Prof. Lin Lu, M.D., Ph.D., Professor Academician, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Peking University Sixth Hospital, Beijing, China.

Dr. Lu is President of Peking University Sixth Hospital, Director of Peking University Institute for Mental Health, Director of National Clinical Research Center for Psychological Disorder, Academician of Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Adequate sleep plays a critical role in restoring physiological functions, recovering energy, enhancing immunity, promoting brain maturation and processing information, as well as consolidating memory. However, scarcity of sleep twists our capability of regulating emotion and performing cognitive functions, which increases the risk of mental illness in the long run.

Also, it is a recognized risk factor for a range of mental health problems. Sleep disturbance is a common symptom of most mental diseases, including anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. In addition, sleep is an important modulator of cardiovascular function, both in physiological conditions and in disease states. Sleep may exert significant effects on the autonomic nervous system, systemic hemodynamics, cardiac function, endothelial function, and coagulation.

In consideration of this, we plan to launch this SI in the hope of bringing inspiration to relevant researchers and doctors and promoting the development of better identification and treatment of relevant diseases.

For submission, please go to [email protected] or submit online through the website: https://www.heartmindjournal.org/submitarticle.asp before 15, August, 2022. Articles in any formats including original research, editorials, reviews, clinical reports, and commentaries will be considered.

Special Issue (Ongoing): Interaction between exercise and cardiovascular disease Edited by Prof. Carl Lavie

Leading Guest Editor:

Dr. Carl Lavie, MD, Professor, Director
John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, United States.

Dr. Lavie is Professor of Medicine and Medical Director, Cardiac Rehabilitation and Preventive Cardiology; Director, Exercise Testing Laboratory; and Staff Cardiologist, Echocardiographic Laboratory at the John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute in New Orleans, Ochsner Clinical School-The University of Queensland School of Medicine.

It is widely accepted that regular physical activity is beneficial for cardiovascular health. Frequent exercise is robustly associated with a decrease in cardiovascular mortality as well as the risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

Exercise prevents both the onset and development of cardiovascular disease and is an important therapeutic tool to improve outcomes for patients with cardiovascular disease. Some benefits of exercise include enhanced mitochondrial function, restoration and improvement of vasculature, and the release of myokines from skeletal muscle that preserve or augment cardiovascular function.

There is evidence to suggest that moderate levels of exercise have been found to be consistently associated with a reduction in cardiovascular disease risk. Nevertheless, a specific dose response relationship between the extent and duration of exercise and the reduction in cardiovascular disease risk and mortality remains unclear.

Further studies are needed to identify the mechanisms that impart cardiovascular benefits of exercise in order to develop more effective exercise regimens, test the interaction of exercise with diet, and develop pharmacological interventions. Thus, the purpose of this Special Issue is to highlight the cardioprotective effects of exercise training and to explore the underlying mechanistic pathways that might explain these benefits.

For submission, please go to [email protected] or submit online through the website: https://www.heartmindjournal.org/submitarticle.asp before 30, August, 2022. Articles in any formats including original research, editorials, reviews, clinical reports, and commentaries will be considered.

Special Issue (Ongoing): Relationship between mental stress and hypertension Edited by Prof. Leonardo Roever

Leading Guest Editor:

Prof. Leonardo Roever, Ph.D., Professor
Federal University of Uberlândia, Brazil.

Cardiovascular Cardiovascular hypertension is the risk factor for various diseases like stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and the leading cause of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. It has caused disability and high mortality worldwide and seriously dwide and seriously consumed medical and social resources, resulting in a heavy burden on families and our consumed medical and social resources, resulting in a heavy burden on families and our society. Apart from traditional biological risk factors of hypertension like heredity, society. Apart from traditional biological risk factors of hypertension like heredity, susceptibility, sodium intake, obesity and lack of exercise, psusceptibility, sodium intake, obesity and lack of exercise, psychological factors like stress, sychological factors like stress, anxiety and depression are also significant risk factors affecting the occurrence and anxiety and depression are also significant risk factors affecting the occurrence and development of hypertension.development of hypertension.

Stress can be defined as a process of perception and response to events or stimuli (stressors) that provokthat provoke emotional arousal in individuals. With the rapid development of society, the e emotional arousal in individuals. With the rapid development of society, the hypertensive population complicated with abnormal mental stress is expanding. The stress hypertensive population complicated with abnormal mental stress is expanding. The stress process can be triggered when people are placed in adverse environments; without adequatprocess can be triggered when people are placed in adverse environments; without adequate e coping resources, stress will persist, causing consequences for the subject, such as memory coping resources, stress will persist, causing consequences for the subject, such as memory loss, mental fatigue, difficulty concentrating, and triggering of anxiety and mood disorders. loss, mental fatigue, difficulty concentrating, and triggering of anxiety and mood disorders.

The type of hypertension closely related to mental stress stimulation is called mental stression is called mental stress--related hypertension. For patients with mental stressrelated hypertension. For patients with mental stress--related hypertension, effective control related hypertension, effective control of mental stress is the basis for managing blood pressure.of mental stress is the basis for managing blood pressure.

With this SI, we hope to explore the identification mechanism and treatment of mental stresst of mental stress--related hypertension as well as the research progress in this area, and to provide guidance for related hypertension as well as the research progress in this area, and to provide guidance for the clinical management of mental stressthe clinical management of mental stress--related hypertension. For example, how stress related hypertension. For example, how stress affects arterial hypertension and CVD.affects arterial hypertension and CVD.

For submission, please go to [email protected] or submit online through the website: https://www.heartmindjournal.org/submitarticle.asp before 30, August, 2022. Articles in any formats including original research, editorials, reviews, clinical reports, and commentaries will be considered.

Special Issue (Ongoing): Stressors and cardiovascular disease Edited by Prof. Ismail Laher

Leading Guest Editor:

Prof. Ismail Laher, Ph.D., Professor
The University of British Columbia, Canada.

Prof. Laher is in the Faculty of Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, The University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. His research interest is vascular function in health and disease.

Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in both developed and developing nations. Many risk factors, such as atherosclerosis, cigarette smoking, hypertension etc. are causally associated with cardiovascular diseases. Other more insidious "stressors" provide a fertile background for the harmful effects of several other risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Recent research provides persuasive evidence that lifestyle factors such as a diet rich in salt, disturbances in sleep, noise, air pollution etc. act as "stressors" of the cardiovascular system, so providing a background against which "traditional" risk factors can act. Mitigating strategies to counteract the harms of these stressors include exercise and yoga. This Special Issue explores the role of stressors of the cardiovascular system and the benefits of mindfulness (exercise, yoga) as mitigating strategies.

Keywords: Cardiovascular disease, lifestyle stressors, mindfulness, exercise

For submission, please go to [email protected] or submit online through the website: https://www.heartmindjournal.org/submitarticle.asp before 30, August, 2022. Articles in any formats including original research, editorials, reviews, clinical reports, and commentaries will be considered.

Special Issue (Ongoing): Recognition and treatment of psychosomatic diseases Edited by Prof. Qingshan Geng

A psychosomatic disorder is a physical disease that is thought to be caused or made worse by mental factors. Taking chest pain as an example, it may be caused by stress without indication of physical disease. Psychosomatic disorders can have mild to severe effects on life quality, from interfering with the average ability to function to causing physical or mental disability. At any given time, a person’s mental state can affect the degree of severity of physical disease. Various factors may play a role in psychosomatic disorders, such as personality traits, genetic or environmental family influences, biological factors, learned behavior, and more. A broad range of physical diseases and conditions may be especially exacerbated by mental factors. These include skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis, high blood pressure, heart problems, and others. Psychosomatic disorders frequently affect the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems as well as the cardiovascular system. Given this, we plan to launch this special issue to promote discovery in this field. By launching this issue, we hope to bring psychosomatic diseases more to the attention of doctors and help the development of better identification and treatment of psychosomatic diseases.

For submission, please go to [email protected] or submit online through the website: https://www.heartmindjournal.org/submitarticle.asp before 30th, April, 2022. Articles in any formats including original research, editorials, reviews, clinical reports, and commentaries will be considered.

Articles accepted for this Issue:
Anxiety and Cardiovascular Disease: A Review and Expert Opinion BY AliAkbar Asadi-Pooya, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Adenosine-induced myocardial ischemia in patient with myocardial bridge: a case report BY Dr. Bingqing Bai, Guangdong Provincial People's Hospital, China.



Special Issue (Ongoing): Lifestyle, social environment, physiological environment and cardiovascular disease Edited by Prof. Xuerui Tan

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including hypertension, heart failure, myocardial infarction, myocardial ischemia, and other related diseases, are the major threats to human health in the world. Some research indicated that life factors such as diet, smoking, exercise, alcohol, sleep, BMI were associated with the prevention, development, outcomes, and rehabilitation of the CVD. These studies give us much inspiration and help us better explore prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. However, we believe that related research and experiments need to be more in-depth and detailed, more basic and more representative, and are urgently needed and necessary. In consideration of this, we plan to launch this Special Issue. Through this, we hope to bring more attention to the interaction between lifestyle factors and CVD, for example, how our eating habits and exercising habits affect CVD and vice versa. In the meantime, we also focus on the influence and intervention of mental and psychological factors on CVD. Furthermore, there are many similar secrets in this field waiting to reveal. We also hope that this SI can bring inspiration to relevant researchers and doctors and that the progress in this field can help people better cope with the risks and threats of CVD.

For submission, please go to [email protected] or submit online through the website: https://www.heartmindjournal.org/submitarticle.asp before 31st, July, 2021. Articles in any formats including original research, editorials, reviews, clinical reports, and commentaries will be considered.

Articles accepted for this Issue:
Relationship between red meat metabolite trimethylamine N-oxide and cardiovascular disease BY Prof. Shu Ye, University of Leicester, UK

Adenosine-induced myocardial ischemia in patient with myocardial bridge: a case report BY Prof. Qing Wang, University Hospital Lausanne, Switzerland

Hypoxia status of uterine fibroids association with increased risk of hypertension BY Prof. Xuerui Tan, The First Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, China



Special Issue (Ongoing): Psychosomatic diseases and Covid-19 Edited by Prof. Jian'an Wang

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are closely related to psychological changes. Many cardiovascular diseases are listed as psychosomatic diseases, such as hypertension, arrhythmia and so on. Studies have shown that reasonable psychological regulation can effectively improve cardiovascular function, and the improvement of cardiovascular function can also promote the emotional stability of patients. We believe that applying psychological research to cardiovascular medicine is urgent and necessary, and that this correlative research needs to be more in-depth, more detailed, more fundamental and more broadly based. In consideration of this, we plan to launch this SI. Through this, we hope to draw more attention to the relationship between psychology and CVD, focusing on the impact of psychological factors on CVD, especially the psychophysiological changes during the period of COVID-19 and the impact on CVD. In addition, we feel that there are many discoveries yet to be made in this field. We also hope that this SI can bring inspiration to relevant researchers and doctors, and anticipate that making progress in this field will help people better understand the concept of psychosomatic integration.

For submission, please go to [email protected] or submit online through the website: https://www.heartmindjournal.org/submitarticle.asp before 31st, August, 2021. Articles in any formats including original research, editorials, reviews, clinical reports, and commentaries will be considered.

Articles accepted for this Issue:
Steroid-Induced Mania in the Context of COVID-19: The Compounding Impact of Treatment on Mental Health BY Wanhong Zheng, West Virginia University School of Medicine, United States

Improving acute and long-term psychological recovery from severe burn injuries with daily psychotherapy: Results from an open clinical trial BY Dr. Leilei Zheng, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, China



Acknowledgements to Heart and Mind Reviewers

Heart and Mind wishes to acknowledge the following experts for their precious time and effort in reviewing manuscripts submitted to HM during the years 2020 and 2021. We sincerely appreciate their useful and detailed comments and recommendations which have greatly enhanced the value of these articles.


Name List:
Abdolmohammad Ranjbar
Abdul Hai Siddique
Adrian Low
Adriana Roncella
Ali Kazem
Amnuay Kleebai
Ana Maria
Angelo Emilio
Anshuman Darbari
Bo Dong
C.-Y. Charles Huang
Celestino Sardu
Chandan Mohapatra
Changjun Yin
Chen Xu
Chih-Sheng Chu
Domenico De Berardis
Douglas Sawyer
E Guasch
Fausto Pinto
Fengshi Tian
Francisco Jose Orosa
Gaurav Kumar
Gianluca Serafini
Gul M
Hong Liu
Hongqiang Sun
Hongyi Wang
Huseyin Ede
Isayeva Ganna
J Finsterer
J Mehta
Jess Fiedorowicz
Jesus Peteiro
Jesús Peteiro
Jialiang Mao
Jiangtian Chen
Sukhvinder Singh
Tharmarajan Ramprasath
Tieqiao Liu
Tsz Kin Ng
Wei He
Weihong Cong
Xianwei Wang
Xiong Peng
Xueyan Liu
Yan Liu
Jianqun Fang
Jingxia Lin
Jordan Jochen
Josef Finsterer
Joseph Shiber
Junkui Wang
Karen Aranha
Kefang Wang
Laher Ismail
Li Sheng
Loren Toussaint
Loren Toussaint
Luca Marsili
M Seeman
Maria Mattioli
Masih Tajdini
Michael V. Vitiello
Michael Vitiello
Mohammad Abdul Hai Siddique
Nastaran Ahmadi
Nazmi Narin
Nina Liu
P Magnusson
Paul Schoenhagen
Peng Xie
Peng Xiong
Pietro Scicchitano
Qing Wang
Richard Josephson
Roger McIntosh
Sepide Taghavi
sepideh taghavi
Shaimaa Amin
Shaojun Wen
Shoichiro Yatsu
Siddharth Sarkar
Srisupornkornkool Kanokwan
Steven Bailey
Yan Zhou
Yan Liu
Yanling He
Yanping Ren
Yanping Ruan
Ying Wang
Yuming Li
Yurdaer Donmez
Yu-Sheng Liu
Zhaohui He


Special Issue (Ongoing): Cardiac Biomarkers in Diabetes Mellitus Edited by Prof. Alexander E. Berezin

Alexander E. Berezin, Professor, MD, PhD, Internal Medicine Department, State Medical University, Zaporozhye, Ukraine

Diabetes mellitus is one of the most prevalent metabolic diseases in developing and developed countries. Cardiac complications of the disease are loosely associated with hyperglycemia, lipid toxicity, endothelial dysfunction, metabolic memory phenomenon, accelerating atherosclerosis, microvascular inflammation and altered immune response. Although micro and macro vascular complications appear prior to cardiac failure in diabetics, there is a need in high sensitive and specific biomarkers that will be able to predict diabetes-induced cardiac damage at early stages. The Special Issue is depicting a role of old and new cardiac biomarkers in diagnosis and prognostication of cardiac complications in diabetes mellitus.
The Special Issue will include research and review articles, as well as editorial comment regarding contemporary state-of-art in biomarker-based strategy in diabetic cardiomyopathy and heart failure.

Special Issue Outline:

    1. Molecular mechanisms of diabetes mellitus-induced cardiomyopathy
    2. Predictive biomarkers of macro vascular complications of 2 type diabetes mellitus
    3. Prognostication of cardiovascular outcomes in diabetes mellitus
    4. Old and new cardiac biomarkers in diabetes-induced cardiomyopathy
    5. The endothelial dysfunction, hypercoagulability and inflammation and their biomarkers in the development of vascular complications in type 1 and type 2 diabetes
    6. Metabolic biomarkers in diabetes-induced heart failure
    7. Diabetic microvascular complication and heart failure developing
    8. Biomarker-guided therapy in diabetes mellitus
    9. Prognostication of heart failure development in diabetes mellitus
    10. Acute coronary syndrome and acute heart failure in diabetics: the role of biomarkers
    11. ST2 in diabetes mellitus-indicted cardiomyopathy
    12. Inflammatory biomarkers in prediction of cardiac complications in diabetes mellitus

Heart and Mind attended the 30th Great Wall International Cardiology Conference, Beijing, China


The 30th Great Wall International Cardiology Conference was held in Beijing, China between October 10th and 13th, 2019. This prestigious conference was attended by over 20,000 doctors and experts of cardiology from 50 countries including Professor Lu Lin, the Editor-in-Chief of Heart and Mind, Professor Liu Meiyan and Professor Geng Qingshan, the Executive Editors-in-Chief of HM. During the GW-ICC they were delighted to welcome Professor Carl J. Lavie of Ochsner Medical Center, Texas, United States, as new Associate Editor-in-Chief of HM.
The 30th Great Wall International Cardiology Conference was holding in Beijing, China
Professor Carl J. Lavie gave an impressive invited talk on the topic of "Psychological Risk Factors and CVD-Impact of Exercise and Fitness". After the presentation, Professor Liu Meiyan and Professor Qingshan Geng, congratulated Professor Lavie on his work and announced his new position with the journal on behalf of Heart and Mind.

Professor Lavie is also the Editor-in-Chief of Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases and an Editorial Board Member for several other journals. As a world-renowned professor recognized for his academic impact in the field of cardiology, Heart and Mind intends that his participation will help in our mission to enhance the expertise available to the Journal.

Professor Carl J. Lavie giving his invited lecture at the 30th GW-ICC
The Editorial Board of HM presenting his appointment letter to Professor Carl J. Lavie

The 2nd Heart and Mind Editorial Board Meeting 2019 held in Beijing China

Jan 23rd, 2019, Beijing, China. The 2nd Heart and Mind Editorial Board Meeting 2019 was held on the occasion of the Chinese Spring Festival. It was a meeting to take stock of the work of the past four years and also a meeting to look forward. Attended were Professor Lin Lu from Peking University Sixth Hospital, Professor Qingshan Geng from People's Hospital of Guangdong Province, Professor Meiyan Liu from Beijing Anzhen Hospital and so on. As members of HM editorial board, they contributed a lot to the Journal's development.

Heart and Mind Editorial Board Meeting Poster Image

The meeting began with Prof. Meiyan Liu making a review over the past four year's work, Prof. Qingshan Geng brought the meeting to a climax with a heated discussion over the revision of HM's introduction. Later, Board members including Ms. Qiu Yang and Ms. Yunting Wang made suggestions on how to run a medical journal.

HM is a platform for doctors all over the world to exchange their ideas and it's getting more influential with the support from its world renowned editorial board members.


Prof. Lin Lu and Prof. Qingshan Geng

Prof. Lin Lu and Prof. Qingshan Geng



Prof. Meiyan Liu and Prof. Yunting Wang

Prof. Meiyan Liu and Prof. Yunting Wang



The Editorial Board Members of HM in China Group Image

The Editorial Board Members of HM in China

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