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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 77-106

Satisfaction with an exercise physiology consultation after treatment for childhood cancer: An opportunity for healthy lifestyle education


1 School of Medical Sciences; Prince of Wales Clinical School, UNSW Medicine, UNSW Sydney; Kids Cancer Centre, Behavioural Sciences Unit, Sydney Children's Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia
2 Prince of Wales Clinical School, UNSW Medicine, UNSW Sydney; School of Women's and Children's Health, UNSW Medicine, UNSW Sydney, Australia
3 School of Medical Sciences, UNSW Medicine, UNSW Sydney; Prince of Wales Clinical School, UNSW Medicine, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
4 School of Medical Sciences, UNSW Medicine, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Correspondence Address:
Dr. David Mizrahi
Kids Cancer Centre, Behavioural Sciences Unit, Sydney Children's Hospital, Level 1 South Wing, Randwick, Sydney, NSW 2031
Australia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/hm.hm_47_19

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Purpose: Many childhood cancer survivors are not engaging in sufficient physical activity despite high chronic disease incidence. We assessed satisfaction and acceptability of attending an exercise physiology consultation. Methods: An 8–18-year-old cancer survivor >1-year posttherapy were assessed by an exercise physiologist (T0). We assessed parents' and survivors' satisfaction and acceptability with the consultation and information received 1-month later (T1). Parents and survivors were asked whether they would see an exercise physiologist again and whether other survivors should be assessed. Results: We recruited 102 participants, with 70 unique families retained. Parents were more satisfied with information received about exercise from T0to T1 (43.4 ± 33.2 vs. 81.5 ± 17.6/100,P < 0.001). Parents reported high satisfaction from the consultation (94.7 ± 10.2/100). Most parents (96.6%) and survivors (95.9%) recommended other survivors see an exercise physiologist. Some parents (37.0%) wanted their child to be more active, while 47.8% of survivors wanted to be more active. Conclusions: There was support for an exercise physiology consultation from parents and survivors. Guidance from an exercise physiologist may be important to alter lifestyle behaviors, which can be potentially beneficial to cardiovascular and psychological well-being.


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